Sinus Pressure or Toothache?

sinus pressure or toothache

Do you have a toothache that just won’t go away? Sinus pressure can cause a lot of discomfort, and is often mistaken for a toothache. In this blog post, we will discuss the relationship between sinus pressure and toothaches. We will also talk about the differences between a toothache caused by sinus pressure and a toothache caused by a dental issue.

The Relationship Between the Sinuses and Teeth

sinus toothache drawing

Are you confused as to why your toothache could be caused by your sinuses? If so, you’re not alone. The relationship between the sinuses and teeth is often a mystery to patients who have never experienced this problem before. You may be surprised to learn that your sinuses are located very close to your teeth. The top of the maxillary (upper) jaw bone contains four separate pockets, which are known as the paranasal sinuses. These pockets are located right next to your nose, and they drain into the nasal cavity.

The maxillary sinus is the largest of the four pockets, and it’s located on the upper part of your cheekbone. The other three sinuses are much smaller, and they’re located in the frontal (forehead), ethmoid (between the eyes), and sphenoid (behind the eyes) bones.

The relationship between the sinuses and teeth is important, because it can cause a toothache when the sinuses are inflamed or infected. The maxillary sinus is especially prone to causing toothaches, because it’s located so close to your upper teeth, especially the tooth roots. When the sinus is inflamed, the pressure inside the sinus can cause pain in your teeth. This pressure can also cause a toothache when you blow your nose.

The Difference Between a Sinus Toothache and a Dental Toothache

So, how do you know if your toothache is caused by sinus pressure or dental issues? There are a few clues that will help you distinguish between the two.

If your toothache occurs mainly when you blow your nose, lean over, or change altitude, it’s probably caused by sinus pressure. A sinus toothache is usually located in the premolar and molar teeth of the upper jaw. These are also known as the cheek teeth or the back teeth.

A sinus toothache will also cause pain in a larger area of your mouth, which is caused by the pressure from inflamed sinuses. A dental toothache usually causes more localized pain in one specific tooth, and this type of toothache is often accompanied by a sensitivity to hot or cold foods and drinks.

A dental toothache can also cause pain in the gums around the tooth, as well as redness and swelling of these tissues. A sinus toothache won’t usually cause pain in the gums or other tissues, so this is a good way to tell if your problem is caused by a sinus issue or a dental problem.

Finally, a sinus toothache may be accompanied by other symptoms. Sinus infections, also known as sinusitis, cause the sinus cavities to become inflamed and swollen. In addition to causing sinus pressure, sinus infections can also cause facial swelling, nasal discharge, and fever.

In some cases, a sinus toothache may simply be due to a cold or flu, allergies, or nasal polyps. To relieve sinus pressure, you can try steam therapy by inhaling hot steam from the shower or a bowl of hot water. If this also relieves your toothache, then it is likely caused by sinus pressure.

In Conclusion

Sinus pressure can cause a toothache when the sinuses are inflamed or infected. The maxillary sinus is especially prone to causing toothaches, because it’s located so close to your upper teeth, especially the tooth roots. When the sinus is inflamed, the pressure inside the sinus can cause pain in your teeth. This pressure can also cause a toothache when you blow your nose.

If your toothache occurs mainly when you blow your nose, lean over, or change altitude, it’s probably caused by sinus pressure. A dental toothache usually causes more localized pain in one specific tooth, and this type of toothache is often accompanied by a sensitivity to hot or cold foods and drinks.

If you’re not sure which type of toothache you have, make an appointment with your dentist for a consultation. They will be able to diagnose the problem and provide the appropriate treatment. Thanks for reading! We hope this blog post has helped clear up some of the confusion about sinus pressure and toothaches.

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Fredrick Farahi, DDS, PC - SmileMclean Dentistry

Fredrick Farahi, DDS, PC

Dr. Fredrick Farahi, a native of Northern Virginia, received his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Howard University in Washington D.C. in 1990. Since then, Dr. Farahi’s continuing education has ventured him toward more challenging areas of Dentistry, including Cosmetic Dentistry, Reconstructive Dentistry, and Implant Dentistry. Dr. Farahi is passionate about keeping up with the latest advances in dentistry.

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